Teaching Listening Skills

Use the following simple strategies to help your toddler listen better:

Read to her

Reading aloud to your toddler is a great way to improve her listening skills. Use silly voices, or emphasize certain words or phrases to get her attention. Try to get fresh reading material as often as you can. If your toddler hasn’t heard the story before, she will have to listen to find out what happens! You can also buy books that are specially written to teach children to listen.

Get down to her level

Bellowing from a great height, or even another room, rarely has the desired effect. Instead, squat down or pick up your child so that you can look her in the eye and grab her attention. She’ll be more inclined to listen if you sit down next to her before reminding her to eat up her porridge.

Similarly, perch on her bed at night when telling her you’re about to turn off the light.

Share mealtimes

It can be hard to find time for your whole family to sit down and talk to each other. Mealtimes are a perfect time to do this. It may not be possible to do this every night, but try to set one day a week, such as Sunday evening, for everyone to sit down and share a meal. If you don’t have a table, see if you can buy a fold-away version. This will give your toddler a chance to see her parents interacting and listening, and it will also give her an opportunity to chat and listen, too.

Be clear

State your message clearly, simply and authoritatively. Your toddler will zone out if you bang on about something. Try not to say, “It’s cold outside and you’ve been poorly lately, so I want you to put on your jacket before we go to the store.” Instead try, “It’s time to put on your jacket.” She will understand what you’re saying more easily and be more inclined to listen.

And try not to phrase something as a question if your toddler doesn’t actually have a choice. “Let’s get into your car seat,” has much more impact than, “Do you want to climb into your car seat now, sweetie?”

Follow through fast

Make it clear that you mean what you say and don’t make threats, or promises, you won’t keep. If you tell your two-year-old, “You can have water with your dinner,” don’t waver five minutes later and give her juice. Making sure your partner shares your rules and that you both stick to them will help your toddler feel more secure.

Make your follow-through speedy, too. You wouldn’t shout “Don’t run across the road!” five times, so try not to repeat less urgent instructions. If you want your toddler to put her cup on the table, say, “Put your cup on the table.” If she doesn’t, guide her hand to place the cup on the table. That way, she knows what you want her to do.

Reinforce your message

It helps to back up what you say with other cues, especially if you’re trying to pull your child away from an absorbing activity. Say, “Time for bed!” and then give a visual cue (flicking the light switch on and off), a physical cue (laying your hand on her shoulder), or a demonstration (steering her towards her bed).

Give warnings

Give your toddler advance notice when a big change is about to happen, especially if she’s happily involved with toys or a friend. There’s no point in giving your toddler a five-minute warning, as she’s too young to understand the concept of time. Instead, when you’re getting ready to leave the house say, “When you have finished dressing your doll, put your coat on.”

Give realistic instructions

If you tell your two-year-old to put her toys away, she may look around the room and think, “No way!” Instead, give her specific and manageable tasks, such as “Let’s put the yellow blocks away.” Once she’s accomplished the first task, you can make it into a game by saying, “Good. Now let’s put the blue blocks away.”

Motivate

Yelling orders may get results, but some children will get upset and no one will enjoy the process. Your toddler will respond better to confident good humour. For example, occasionally use a silly voice or a song to deliver your message. You could sing, “Now it’s time to brush your teeth” to the tune of London Bridge is Falling Down, for example.

Stress the benefits of getting the job done quickly. Say, “Brush your teeth and then we’ll read your favourite book”, instead of “Brush your teeth or you’ll get fillings”, or “Brush your teeth NOW!” Praise her when she finishes brushing and before you do a quick checking brush, with “Good listening!”

The good humor, affection and trust you show your toddler will make her want to listen to you. She’ll know that you love her and think she’s special. This is important when you need to be firm, too. Straightforward, authoritative instructions are more powerful when they’re accompanied by a hug or a smile. Then your toddler learns that paying attention is worthwhile.

Set a good example

Your toddler will be a better listener if she sees that you are a good listener, too. Try to listen to her as respectfully as you would to any adult. Look at her when she talks to you, respond politely and let her finish without interrupting. It may be difficult when you’re cooking dinner and she’s especially chatty, but try not to turn your back on her while she’s talking.

As with so many behaviors, the old saying “Do as I say, not as I do”, has no value when teaching your toddler to listen. It’s what you do that counts.

Summer Camp 2016

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As in previous years, this summer we will be offering a six week Summer Camp for children up to age 8. This year all activities are based on the Pirates and Princesses theme. Kids are grouped by age levels and will be rotating through centers for active music, story telling and dramatization, creative arts and crafts, circle time, snack and outdoor play. For further information on dates, schedules and costs, please call 8356-8344 & 8356-8330 from Mon-Fri 8:00am to 2:00pm and Mon-Thurs 3:00pm-5:00pm.

Happy Mother’s Day!

This week the children have learned about zoo and jungle animals, we had lots of fun while pretending to be monkeys in circle time with Mr. Mike and they enjoyed hearing stories about our jungle friends while learning the sounds each one of them make. Children played with animal puppets and started to recognize and name some of them.

During creativity time the children made a zebra out of hand prints, a lion made out of hearts which helped them review this shape and a monkey with a special message for mommies.
For mothers day celebration the kids made a wooden canvas painting using different bright colors and painting techniques, they also learned an “I love you” poem dedicated to their mommies.

During physical development children have been practicing for their end of the year program, showing their best dance moves!

This weeks vocabulary words:
jungle
zoo
monkey
giraffe
elephant
zebra
lion
” I love you”

Next week’s vocabulary words:
Tiger
Crocodile
Kangaroo
Bear
Rhinoceros
Zoo review

We hope you have a great mother’s day in company of your loved ones!

Winter Clothing!

This week we learned about winter clothing. We want to thank all of you for participating by sending your children with items to show. They had lots of fun dressing up with scarves, mittens, hats, gloves, coats and jackets.

During creativity we showed the students to paint using different techniques. They experienced paint using rollers, brushes, stamps, golf balls and colors. They also modeled play dough with their hands, using different instruments, as well.

During physical development the children had lots of fun doing circuits, reviewing the concepts of up and down, side to side, jump, run and gallop. We also danced to music using tambourines and following rhythms. The class loved Frosty’s Story Book and song. We role played using a scarf and magic hat just like Frosty!

On Friday, we celebrated Maria Ximena’s birthday. The whole class enjoyed eating cupcakes, participating in making Maria Ximena’s crown and singing Happy Birthday to her.

Next week, the children will learn about forest animals :squirrel, fox, raccoon, picking up new vocabulary words, such as: bear/ polar bear, whales/ beluga, penguins, ice, water and cave.

Here are a few pictures we took during the week. We hope you enjoy them!

Caterpillars and Butterflies Winter Fun

Please dress up your child in black (pants, top and shoes). Mrs. Vero will supply accessories for the kids to wear as simple costumes. The kidss will perform as penguins for the following songs:
Click here for Waddlin Walk

 

Frosty the Snowman
In relation to the penguins, the kids have really been enjoying this lovely story: Little Penguin’s Tale